Curriculum

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Our academic curriculum is designed to prepare your child for college...and prepare them for life!


Secondary Campus Course List

Please note that course placement/selection is done on an individual basis,
tailored to each student’s interests and strengths.

Grade Seven

Bible: Old/New Testament Surveys
Math (Math 87, Pre-Algebra, Algebra I)
English (Standard or Honors)
Life Science
American History
Physical Education
Seventh Bell Rotation Courses: Computer, Latin, and Art
Elective choice of (1) Band, (2) Chorus, or (3) First Bell Exploratory Courses which could  include Spanish, Teen Living and Robotics

Grade Eight
 
Bible Lightbearers, Apologetics
Math (Pre-Algebra, Algebra I, Geometry)
English (Standard or Honors)
Physical Science (Standard or Honors)
World History I, Creation to the Reformation (Standard or Honors)
Physical Education
Sixth Bell Rotation Courses: Computer, Latin and Art
Elective choice of (1) Band, (2) Chorus, or (3) First Bell exploratory courses which could include Spanish, Teen Living and Robotics


Grades 9-12

Bible (Students are required to take one Bible class for each year of attendance at ASCS)

Bible 9/10: Life of Christ, How to Study the Bible, Book of Acts, Church History
Bible 11/12: Systematic Theology and Doctrine, Worldviews, Philosophy, Ethics and Apologetics
Honors Bible* is available for students in all Bible courses. In order to earn the honors Bible credit, students must attend church regularly, complete monthly Bible reading assignments, and complete a minimum of 2-3 hours per month of ministry work in their church.
Dual Enrollment Bible (Christian Thought, three semester hours through Bryan College will be taught 2015-16)

*Bible Honors Program Information Downloads

English - Four credits of English are required.

English 9
English 9 Honors
English 10
English 10 Honors
English 11
English 12
Dual Enrollment College English Composition I (three semester hours through John Brown University)
Dual Enrollment English II Literary Analysis (three semester hours through John Brown University)

Science - Four credits of Science are required (three for General Diploma)   
                                       
Earth Science                                                                                                                       
Biology/Biology Honors
Anatomy/Anatomy Honors
Chemistry(Pre-requisite: enrolled in or have taken Algebra 2)
Chemistry Honors (Pre-requisite: enrolled in or have taken Algebra 2)
Physics Honors (Pre-requisite: Pre-Calculus or taking concurrently)
Dual Enrollment Physical Science (three semester hours through John Brown University)
Dual Enrollment Cell Biology (four semester hours through John Brown University)

Mathematics - Four credits of math are required, including Pre-Calculus Honors (three credits for the General Diploma).

Algebra I/Algebra I Honors
Geometry/Geometry Honors
Advanced Algebra/Trigonometry
Algebra II/Algebra II Honors                                                       
Pre-Calculus Honors
Dual Enrollment Survey of Calculus (three semester hours through John Brown University)
Dual Enrollment Math for the Liberal Arts (three semester hours through Regent University)

Humanities - Four credits of Humanities are required.

World History II
World History II Honors
Economics and Geography
US History
US Government
Dual Enrollment American History (six semester hours through John Brown University) 
Dual Enrollment Government (NEW 2015-16)

Physical Education/Health -Two credits of PE/Health are required

Health/PE 9/10
Advanced Girls PE (Prerequisite: one PE credit and junior or senior)
Adv. Boys PE/Weightlifting (Prerequisite: one PE credit and junior or senior)

The two sport option may be used to fulfill PE/Health credits. In order to earn each PE/Health credit, the student must successfully participate on a sport’s team for two seasons, within 9th-12th grades.

Foreign Language - Two credits of the same foreign language are needed for the College Preparatory Diploma

Spanish I
Spanish II
Spanish III Honors
Dual Enrollment Intermediate Spanish (Three semester hours through John Brown University)

Students who have completed Spanish I may continue into Spanish II only if a 77% has been earned during the first year. An 80% average is needed to enroll in Spanish III and an 85% average needed for Intermediate Spanish.

Advanced Microsoft Applications - One credit is required for graduation

The course is designed to teach students how to navigate and effectively use the tools in Microsoft Word, Excel, and PowerPoint. The emphasis is upon the student learning how to use these tools to complete excellent assignments in all of their subject areas.

Speech - One credit of Speech is required for graduation. Speech may be taken in grades 10 - 12
Dual Enrollment Public Speaking


Honors, Dual Enrollment and AP Prerequisites and Requirements

Advanced Placement and Dual Enrollment classes are offered for 11th and 12th graders. 10th Grade students may enroll in AP Music Theory.

Honors Courses- Prerequisites include instructor recommendation and a 93% average (85% for Pre-Calculus, Math for the Liberal Arts, and Calculus) in the previous course.

Advanced Placement Music Theory- Students desiring to take this course must have demonstrated the ability to succeed in a college course. Students taking AP courses are required to purchase their textbooks, pay for ($87) and take the College Board AP exam in the spring.

Dual Enrollment- ASCS partners with John Brown University, Regent University, and Bryan College to offer ELEVEN dual enrollment courses.  Students will enroll in one or more of these three universities and will receive college credit upon successful completion of the course. The courses will be taught at Atlantic Shores in the regular schedule by our teachers, who are adjunct-college faculty members. JBU is offering our students a reduced tuition rate of $315 for each three credit hour course. The Regent course Math for the Liberal Arts costs $465*. These universities have waived all other normal fees, making these courses very affordable. The courses will be taught using the university’s curriculum, and students will have to purchase any required textbooks. See each course description below for prerequisites. There needs to be a minimum of eight students enrolled in each class. Prerequisites for JBU classes include 3.0 cumulative GPA, 950 SAT (CR+ Math) or 20 ACT, a 90% or higher average in the previous course (85% for math), and teacher/counselor recommendations. Students who have a GPA of 3.25 or higher and scored 95 (CR + Math) on the PSAT do not have to take the ACT or SAT. Students may take only two JBU courses per semester.  *Bible is $350.

Advanced Placement

AP Music Theory:  This college level course is designed for students with above average ability in music. Students will engage in intensive study of all aspects of music theory including notation, dictation, and ear training in accordance with the guidelines established by the Advanced Placement Committee of the College Entrance Examination Board. Open to grades 10-12. (Prerequisite: in the 10th grade or above with a teacher recommendation)

Dual Enrollment

Math 1123 Survey of Calculus (Three semester hours through John Brown University)

An introduction to the concepts of differentiation and integration. An emphasis is placed on applied problems in physical, life, and social sciences. (Prerequisites: In addition to other JBU prerequisites Pre-Calculus Honors and an ACT math score of 24 or SAT math score of 580.)

Math 101 Math for the Liberal Arts (Three semester hours through Regent University)

Study of several different fields of mathematics and their applications for liberal arts students. Through the process of discovery with everyday applications, students consider the beauty and elegance of mathematics as they improve their critical thinking and analytical skills. Topics include set theory, inductive and deductive reasoning, basic probability and statistics, number theory, algebraic modeling, basic geometry and trigonometry, and finance applications. This course cannot be applied to the Regent mathematics major. (Prerequisites: Algebra II with a grade of B or above and teacher/administrative approval)

EGL 1013 English I: Composition (Three semester hours through John Brown University)

Writing in a variety of modes and styles for different audiences and purposes. The sequence of written assignments builds on writing from personal experience and gradually integrates perspectives from published sources. A short research-based essay is required. After the JBU course is completed, students will continue with either 11th or 12th grade Honors Literature.

EGL 1023 English II: Literary Analysis and Research (Three semester hours through John Brown University)

An introduction to the analysis of literary texts through reading and researching a selection of short stories, poems, dramas, and novels. In addition to essays of analysis of such works, a substantial research paper is required. (Prerequisite: EGL 1013 English I: Composition)

HST 2113 United States History to 1865 (Three semester hours through John Brown University)
A survey of American political, social, and economic history from the colonial era through the Civil War.


HST 2123 United States History since 1865 (Three semester hours through John Brown University)
A survey of American political, social, and economic history from the reconstruction era to the present.

BIO 1124 Cell Biology (Three semester hours through John Brown University)
An introduction to the study of living systems, beginning with the molecules of life and progressing to cellular and organismic levels of organization.  Students are exposed to numerous topics in biochemistry, cell structure, energy processing, genetics, and molecular biology.  Laboratory exercises reinforce concepts and biological processes discussed in the lecture.  Three-hour lecture-discussion and one two-hour laboratory per week.  (Prerequisite: Biology and Chemistry)

GSC 1023 Physical Science (Three semester hours through John Brown University)
Selected and coherent topics in the sciences of physics, chemistry, and earth science. An evaluation of the scientific method and the contributions of the theories and facts of science to society are emphasized so that students have sufficient information to evaluate arguments using scientific justification. (To be taught 2016-2017)


LS 2113 Intermediate Spanish I (Three hours through John Brown University)
Advancing study of the language skills of listening, reading, speaking, and writing. The first course entails a comprehensive grammar analysis; the second involves much cultural and literary reading and the writing of short compositions. (Prerequisite: Spanish III)

Comm 2523 Public Speaking (Three semester hours through John Brown University)
Students gain theoretical and applied knowledge of public speaking techniques. Speeches will include extemporaneous, impromptu, informative, persuasive, and rhetorical analysis. After the JBU course is completed, the students will continue with drama and the rest of the regular Speech II/drama curriculum.


Christian Thought 112 

Electives
(Note: Only those electives with adequate student interest will be offered)

Art I
This course employs a range of traditional and new art media to explore their own identity, aesthetics, art history and theory, divergent cultural perspectives, and various issues that make up their visual culture. It is a fundamental goal of this course to help students develop the skills to understand the History of Art and to creatively invent aesthetic forms that incorporate techniques passed down through the ages by the Masters of Art.

Art II – The prerequisite is Art I
Students enrolled in Art II are expected to organize the components of their personal artwork through their knowledge of Principles of Design and Elements of Art.  At this level, their personal style will become more apparent.  In Art II, students will focus on composition and layout.  They will delve deeper into a broad range of mediums and draw on information learned in Art I and apply that knowledge to original works of art based on topics provided by the teacher. (Prerequisite: Art I)

Art III – The prerequisite is Art II
In Art III, students will engage in the creative process by way of producing two-dimensional and three-dimensional pieces, working on a college portfolio and applying knowledge from previous years of experience to original works of art based on a broad topic provided by the teacher.  The students at this level will initiate, define and solve challenging visual art problems independently using skills such as analysis, synthesis and evaluation.  Art III students will leave this level prepared to enter an arts program at the college level.  (Prerequisite: Art II)

Art IV/Pre-AP – The prerequisite is Art III
The Studio Art Program consists of the mediums - 2-D Design, 3-D Design and Drawing.  It is designed for students who are seriously interested in the practical experience of art.  Students work with diverse media. styles, subjects, and content to create a portfolio of work to be submitted at the end of the year for outside evaluation.  (Prerequisite: Art III and/or teacher recommendation)

Band
High School Band is offered during zero bell (7:30 - 8:15 am), and Middle School Band is offered first bell.

Choir/Choir Ensemble
High School Choir is open for students in grades 9-12. Students must audition and have permission from the choir director to be a part of the Choir Ensemble.

Middle School Chorus is offered during 1st bell.

Personal Finance
The prerequisite is Algebra I. This math class will count as a math credit for those earning the General Diploma only.

Resource
This program is for those students who need additional assistance to be successful in their coursework. Students seeking to be accepted to Resource will apply to the Director of Resource who will determine placement by testing and IEPs.

Journalism/Yearbook
Journalism/Yearbook is offered during zero bell (7:30 - 8:15 am). Students who wish to take journalism must complete an application and be approved by the journalism advisor.

SAT/ACT Preparation - one semester
The SAT/ACT Prep class will teach students ways to improve their effectiveness and efficiency in test taking and how do an appropriate analysis of questions by using real SAT exam questions.  Students will focus on the math and writing portion of the exam.

Digital Photography - one semester
Digital Photography is an introductory course designed to train students on how to use standard digital camera equipment, provide instructions in basic design principles, rules of composition, history of photography and exposure to the masters of photography, past and present.  Students will no experience as well as those who are already camera-savvy will find this class worth taking.  Please note: a digital camera is required; phone cameras do not allow for high enough quality.  

Video Production I - one semester
This course is designed to provide the student with an introduction to the theory and technique of film/video production. The class will provide the basic study of story, script writing, directing, camera operations, lighting, sound, and editing techniques. Careful attention will also be paid to the positions within the film/video industry. Prerequisite: Must own a video camera and be a junior or senior.

Reel Faith
This course explores how religious beliefs and behaviors are embedded, embodied, and emplotted in motion pictures, both modern and classic.  Through the screenings and discussions we will examine the impact motion picures have on our religious imagination, spiritual journeys, ethical discourse and notion of community, from a Christian worldview.  This class will enable students to engage in honest, reflective discourse with one another, preparing them to defend their faith in the world at large and to make wise choices when it comes to entertainment.

Business and Entrepreneurship
An entrepreneur is a person who has possession of a new enterprise, venture or idea and is accountable for the inherent risks and the outcome. This course provides an opportunity to develop Biblical concepts, attitudes, and philosophies about business and entrepreneurship.


Secondary Course Descriptions

BIBLE

7th Grade — Old Testament Survey — Route 66 (OT)
This course covers the entire context of the Old Testament including geography, culture, people, events, prophecies about Jesus, and important sections of Scripture.  Various life application lessons are taught throughout. Students watch One Night with the King.


8th Grade —The Lightbearers curriculum is designed to help young believers understand life while living a Christ centered life. This course is to help shape one's "worldview" not by the world but by the Gospel. You will discover that God not only has communicated how to have a relationship with Him through Jesus, but also has provided guidelines for shaping society for everyone's benefit.

9th/10th Grade — The Life of Christ — The Life of Christ (Positive Action)
Jesus has changed the course of history as has no other person or influence.  This in-depth study of the Gospel of John acquaints your students with the visible and personal Jesus, the Christ of God.  Students study the life of Christ from birth to death, covering His teachings, miracles, and sacrifice.  Student will learn what it means to have a personal relationship with Christ.  Students watch The Gospel of John and The Passion of the Christ.

9th/10th Grade — The Book of Acts and Church History/How to Study the Bible — Bible Truths (Bob Jones) Mastering Bible Study Skills (ACSI)
This course is split by semesters.  First, students study the book of Acts and the spread of the Gospel to the Roman world while understanding its application to life.  Important details of the church are examined, including the Reformation, and select early church fathers are featured.  Second, students learn the inductive method of Bible study.  This will empower them to study the scriptures effectively and more accurately for years to come.

11th/12th Grade — Systematic Theology and Doctrine — Behold Your God (Positive Action)
This course covers the first three key doctrines of systematic theology.  They are Theology Proper, Christology, and Pneumatology.  In addition, God’s attributes and works are examined, and students are challenged to appropriately respond relative to these three categories.  Righteousness, holiness, and sanctification are just a few of the investigated topics.  

11th/12th Grade — Worldviews, Philosophy, Ethics, Apologetics — Understanding the Times (Summit Press)  Secular Humanism, Marxism, Cosmic Humanism, Islam, and Postmodernism are compared to Christianity in the areas of theology, philosophy, ethics, biology, psychology, sociology, law, politics, economics, and history.  Students learn the fallacies of opposing worldviews and learn how to think biblically and defend the faith.  

ENGLISH


English 7

In this class students will become familiar with exemplary authors and literary works through a sustained and structured study of literature. Students will read a variety of literature with universal themes with emphases on how an author’s philosophy pervades his writings. All literature will be viewed in light of Scripture. Students will explore and articulate complex issues and ideas encountered in secular and Christian environments while learning the tools to effectively communicate. Careful research, documentation, and appropriate expression are all essential to effective written communication. Students will develop a full command of the English language evidenced by their use of standard English and speaking and writing abilities.

English 8

Assumes mastery of the basic grammar and mechanics covered in English 7. Students must be mature, intellectually motivated, and able to demonstrate proficiency in reading and writing. This class focuses heavily on literature and writing while teaching and reinforcing grammar through the study of written texts. Students will develop a biblical filter through which to view all media. This class is faster-paced with more emphasis on independent thought and higher-level thinking skills. Students are expected to go above and beyond the course requirements to better understand the material.

Honors English 8

Assumes mastery of the basic grammar and mechanics covered in English 7. Students must be mature, intellectually motivated, and able to demonstrate proficiency in reading and writing. This class focuses heavily on literature and writing while teaching and reinforcing grammar through the study of written texts. Students will develop a biblical filter through which to view all media. This class is faster-paced with more emphasis on independent thought and higher-level thinking skills. Students are expected to go above and beyond the course requirements to better understand the material.

English 9

This class offers training in effective reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills. Students will read novels, short stories, poetry, drama, and non-fiction. Students will learn to organize their thoughts, construct fluent essays, and present their ideas in effective written and oral formats. The grammatical aspect of this class will be taught through a text book and reinforced through literary writing.

Honors English 9

Assumes the mastery of grammar, mechanics, and literary interpretation covered in previous English classes. Students should be mature, intellectually motivated, and have a desire to be challenged. This class covers at least the material covered in English 9 but moves at a faster pace; therefore, students will have covered even more material by the end of the year. Students are also expected to go above and beyond the course requirements to better understand the material.

English 10

A year-long course in which sophomores will develop critical reading and writing skills. The course develops these skills through the learning and practice of basic grammar rules, punctuation and capitalization, as well as correct sentence structure and paragraph formation. Students experience various writing styles including narration, exposition, description, and persuasion, focusing on the 5-paragraph essay. Students develop vocabulary through study of accumulative vocabulary units, with definitions, sentences, and unit quizzes. Literature is incorporated into English 10 through the reading of selected plays, short stories, and poetry found in the accepted text. Classical works such as King Arthur and Camelot as well as a Shakespearian play are studied.

English 10 – Honors

This course is designed for the superior student, who is mature, intellectually motivated, and who demonstrates proficiency in reading and writing. The course centers on a genre study of short stories, nonfiction, poetry, drama, and novels, with particular emphasis on applying reading strategies and examining elements of literature. Writing includes analytical, literary and comparative multi-paragraph essays, including book critiques. Reading comprehension and writing skills are improved through vocabulary and grammar studies.

English 11

This course is an introduction to American literature, with particular emphasis on historical and authorial backgrounds. Major worldviews studied include Puritanism, rationalism, romanticism, transcendentalism, realism, naturalism, and modernism; these are contrasted to biblical Christianity. Writing includes a semester-long research paper, with emphasis on proper documentation and avoidance of plagiarism. Reading comprehension and writing skills are improved through vocabulary and grammar studies.

English 11- Honors

This course is designed for the superior student, who is mature, intellectually motivated, and who demonstrates proficiency in reading and writing. In addition to satisfying the objectives of English 11, the course provides each student the opportunity to become more skillful in analytical classroom discussion, critical analysis in written expression, comparative analysis of literature and interpretation of more sophisticated reading material.

English 12 is a year-long course in which seniors will enhance critical reading and writing skills developed in previous grade levels. Skills in grammar and usage are emphasized through the review of and expected utilization of basic grammar rules, punctuation, and capitalization in weekly writing, assigned papers, and projects. Advanced sentence structure and paragraph formation are emphasized through writing that also develops analytical skills. Students combine the rhetorical strategies of narration, exposition, persuasion, and description to produce effective compositions, reports, and projects. Students develop vocabulary through study of accumulative vocabulary units, with definitions, sentences, and unit quizzes. Literature is incorporated into English 12 through the reading of classic novels from literature and will emphasize close reading, class discussion, analysis, and interpretation of British Literature. Classical works such as Shakespeare’s Macbeth and Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales are studied as well as sonnets, ballads, short stories and poetry of writers from the Middle Ages to Modern Era.

ART

INTRODUCTION TO ART (Exploratory Art)

This course introduces students to the Elements of Art and the Principles of Design through observation and experience in drawing, painting, sculpting, and fine crafts.  The students will be assigned projects that allow exploration with materials and themes.

ART I

This course employs a range of traditional and new art media to explore their own identity, aesthetics, art history and theory, divergent cultural perspectives, and various issues that make up their visual culture. It is a fundamental goal of this course to help students develop the skills to understand the History of Art and to creatively invent aesthetic forms that incorporate techniques passed down through the ages by the Masters of Art.

ART II

This course is designed to work with composition and layout using the Elements of Art and the Principles of Design.  Students will delve deeper into media and draw on information learned in Art I and apply that knowledge to original works of art based on a broad topic provided by the teacher.  Art I is a pre-requisite for this course.

ART III

This course’s focus is more of an independent, college-preparation art studio. It will engage students in the creative process by way of producing two-dimensional and three-dimensional pieces, building a college-prep portfolio, planning and organizing art showings, and applying knowledge from previous years of experience to original works of art based on a broad topic provided by the teacher. Art I and Art II are pre-requisites for this course.

ART IV/Pre-AP

The Studio Art Program consists of the mediums - 2-D Design, 3-D Design and Drawing.  It is designed for students who are seriously interested in the practical experience of art.  Students work with diverse media. styles, subjects, and content to create a portfolio of work to be submitted at the end of the year for outside evaluation.  Art III and/or teacher recommendation is a pre-requisite for this course.



MATH

7th GRADE GENERAL MATH (Math 87)

PRE-ALGEBRA 

Pre-algebra deals with the addition, subtraction, multiplication and division of whole numbers, fractions, and decimals as they apply to algebra.  Ratios, absolute value, and working with real numbers are also covered.  Students are expected to solve simple algebraic equations and graph basic linear functions. Some parts of geometry are given throughout the course.

ALGEBRA I 

Students will learn to work with real numbers and the different properties of arithmetic operations.  There will be practice working exponents and powers; roots and radicals.  Graphing inequalities and linear equations will also be covered, including the slope a line.  Students will solve various one and two variable equations, and simplify different polynomials.  The quadratic equation will also be introduced.

GEOMETRY

This is a course examining two and three dimensional geometric figures and their properties, geometric constructions, logic utilizing deductive and inductive reasoning, making conjectures and formulating conclusions, and development of formal and logical proofs.  As a prerequisite for this course, students must have had a passing grade or above in Algebra 1.

ALGEBRA 2

This course is an extension of Algebra 1 and Geometry. Students will gain experience with algebraic solutions to problems in many concept areas, including the solutions of systems of linear equations, quadratic equations, solutions for logarithmic and exponential functions, polynomial and rational functions and solutions involving the complex number system. This course also investigates trigonometric ratios, identities, conic sections, the binomial theorem, and probability. Calculator applications will be introduced.

PERSONAL FINANCE

This course is designed to help students understand the impact of individual choices on occupational goals and future earnings potential. Real world topics covered will include: income, money management, spending and credit, as well as saving and investing. Students will design personal and household budgets; simulate use of checking and saving accounts; demonstrate knowledge of finance, debt, and credit management; and evaluate and understand insurance and taxes. This course will provide a foundational understanding for making informed personal financial decisions.  There are no prerequisites for this course.

ADVANCED ALGEBRA AND TRIGONOMETRY

PRE-CALCULUS HONORS 

Pre-Calculus is an advanced mathematics course that uses meaningful problems and appropriate technologies to build upon previously learned mathematical concepts to develop the underpinnings of calculus. Pre-Calculus closely examines systems of equations and inequalities, matrices, functions (including polynomial, rational, logarithmic, exponential, and trigonometric), analytical trigonometry, conic sections, and basic probability. Graphing calculators and application software will be used regularly to teach and assess topics presented in the course. Upon successful completion of the course, students will be prepared to take calculus and other higher-level mathematics courses.

SCIENCE
The following are course descriptions/objectives, and include the Virginia Standards of Learning and National Science Education Standards.  All science courses are one-year laboratory courses unless otherwise noted.

Life Science (Grade 7)

Students will learn to use scientific skills and process to explain all of the important aspects of the living world.  Emphasis of the course is on the understanding of change, cycles, patterns, and relationships which includes:  structure and function in living systems; the cell – reproduction and heredity; regulation and behavior; populations and ecosystems; science and technology.

Physical Science (Grade 8 ) Prerequisite:  Completion of Life Science


Students will use scientific skills and processes to explain and predict the outcome of certain interactions which occur between physics and chemistry and will understand and interpret natural phenomena.  Topics of study include properties and changes of properties in matter; motion and forces; energy and the transfer of energy, structure of the atom; chemical reactions; science and technology.

Honors Physical Science (Grade 8 ) Prerequisite:  Completion of Life Science, Math 87 or Pre-Algebra and approval of instructor*.


Course is designed for self-motivated students who desire future placement in Honors courses.  This course is designed to encourage independent and analytical thinking skills.  In addition to objectives for the regular Physical Science, special projects are assigned and carried out throughout the year.   (Students might be required to be involved in an environmental project.)  Students who pass the course with a yearly average of 90 or above qualify for Honors Biology.  (*student has demonstrated proficiency in applicable subject area)

Earth Science (Grade 9 ) Prerequisite:  Completion of Life Science and Physical Science.  Course is open to 9th – 10th grade students.

Students will use scientific skills and processes to explain the physical behavior of the environment, Earth, and the universe.  Topics of instruction include:  structure of the Earth’s systems; Earth’s history; energy in the Earth’s system; the solar system and space; geochemical cycles; meteorology; natural resources.

Honors Biology (Grade 9) Prerequisite:  Completion of Advanced Physical Science and/or approval of instructor* Course is open to 9th grade students. 

Students will discuss living systems and their interdependence and how these systems interact with man, essential chemical and biochemical principles, protein synthesis and the classification system.  Specific topics include:  cell and cell function; reproduction and heredity; ecology.  (*student has demonstrated proficiency in applicable subject area)

Biology (Grade 10 ) Pre-requisite: Completion of Earth Science.  Course is open to 9th and 10th grade students and must be completed by the end of the sophomore year. 

Students will use and demonstrate scientific skills, processes and major biological concepts to explain:   the cell; molecular basis of heredity; plants and their structure; behavior of organisms ecology.

Chemistry 

Honors Chemistry (Grade 11 -12) Prerequisite: Completion of Honors Biology, Honors Anatomy and Algebra 2 (or concurrently enrolled ) and/or approval of instructor*

Students will demonstrate scientific skills and processes to explain composition and interactions of matter in the world in which we live including:  structure of atom; structure and properties of matter; chemical reactions and formulas; science and technology in local, national and global challenges.

Honors Physics (Grade 11 -12) Prerequisite: Completion of Honors Biology, and Pre-Calculus(or concurrently enrolled in Pre-Calculus) and/or approval of instructor*

Students will demonstrate the ability to use scientific skills and processes to explain and predict the outcome of certain interactions which occur between matter and energy. Specific topics include: mechanics, properties of matter, gravity, conservation of energy, fluid dynamics, heat, waves, light, electric currents, etc.  

Anatomy/Physiology (Grades 10-12 ) Prerequisite: Completion of Biology.
Course is open to 10th – 12th grade students who have completed the Biology requirement. 

This course is designed to be a study of the anatomical structure of the human body and will involve a balance between gross anatomical study and histology.  Topics include:  organization of human body systems, chemistry, cells and their functions, and the perpetuation of life.

Honors Anatomy (Grade 11 -12) Prerequisite: Completion of Biology or Honors Biology and /or approval of instructor* Course is open to 10th – 12th grade students who have completed the Biology requirement. 

This course is designed to be a study of the anatomical structure of the human body and will involve a balance between gross anatomical study and histology.  Topics include:  organization of human body systems, chemistry, cells and their functions, and the perpetuation of life with an emphasis on form-function relationships.  Labs will include various organ dissections.  (*student has demonstrated proficiency in applicable subject area)

                  

SOCIAL STUDIES

United States History (Grade 7)

United States History is designed as a middle school course touching all the major areas of U.S History from its discovery to the present with emphasis on the late 19th century and 20th century.  A solid foundation in U.S. History will help students with future history classes as they enter high school.  Students will learn about the geography, people, and events that have given us our colorful history.  The Bible will be used extensively to further strengthen the topics that are being studied.  After all, history is “His story.”

Ancient World History (Grade 8)

Ancient World History for Christian Schools is designed as middle school course touching all the major areas of the ancient world from Creation to the renaissance.  A solid foundation in ancient history will help students with future history classes as they enter high school.  Students will learn about ancient world civilizations and events that shaped the history of our world.  The Bible will be used extensively to further strengthen the topic that is being studied.  After all, history is “His story.”

Modern World History (Grade 9)

Modern World History begins with the Reformation and concludes with late 20th century. This course will explore, from a Christian perspective, how western culture has influenced the development of the world as we know it today.  Special emphasis will be placed on the growth of the biblical church and its influence on an emerging “global” community.  An equal emphasis will be placed on the development of the student’s ability to effectively state and defend a literal and biblical view of history, while simultaneously broadening their ability to analyze and assess historical evidence.

Geography/Economics (Grade 10)

The course objective for Geography/Economics is to introduce the student to the various components of economics and the cultures of the world, incorporating a biblical world view from both a broad and personal perspective.

United States History (Grade 11)

This course is a survey of United States History from a Christian perspective.  Special emphasis is placed upon the role of Providence in the shaping of our national character and direction during the early years.  Biblically based critical thinking skills are emphasized and developed in order to place events into proper perspective as they have occurred since the founding of the republic. Each student will be challenged to develop his/her reading, writing, and research skills through assignments which train them to express their thoughts effectively,  as well as base them upon a biblically sound worldview.

Government (Grade 12)

This course will set forth the fundamental issues of government and the principles of a free society, including: liberty, equality, opportunity, and majority rule and minority rights.  We will examine the development of our American system of government and its’ three branches. American Government is a course designed to equip students to participate in the process of our local, state, and federal governments in accordance with Romans 13:1-7 and reveal the impact that Christian principles had on the Founding Fathers and, consequently, the United States Constitution.

Secondary Textbooks

Mathematics

Course I through Algebra II — Saxon
Pre-Calculus
Personal Finance — Dave Ramsey/Personal Finance — Bob Jones University Press

English

Literature — Holt
Grammar — Holt/Warriners/Bob Jones University Press
Vocabulary — Sadlier
Speech — Bob Jones University Press

Science

Bob Jones University Press

History and Government
Bob Jones University Press

Spanish
Prentice Hall

Bible
Summit Ministries
Positive Action for Christ
Association for Christian Schools International
Bob Jones University
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